Coal / Energy

Grid operator’s report details energy market shift to clean energy

The 2011 report not only showed the market was working competitively, but also showed that a transition to lower emissions is possible without price spikes. In fact, the total price per megawatt-hour of wholesale power dropped 6.2 percent across the system.

EAGLEVILLE, PA — “Coal-fired generation suffered in 2011, and will likely continue to experience losses in the future. Electricity from coal lost two percent of the overall market, but the cost of that electricity increased nearly twenty percent, largely due to increased operational costs and environmental regulations requiring emissions control investments.

The costs of compliance are adding up and making dirty coal more expensive, and, thus, less attractive in PJM’s power market. ‘These investments may result in higher offers in the capacity market, and if units do not clear, in the retirement of some units,’ said the report.

This means between 5,764 and 6,936 megawatts (MW) of coal generation may soon be forced to retire, according to the report. PJM lists between 26 and 30 coal plants ‘at risk’ of being priced out of the market — meaning it could soon be dramatically cleaner.”

— Silvio Marcacci, Clean Technica

Read the whole story: http://cleantechnica.com/2012/03/19/grid-operators-report-details-energy-market-shift-to-clean-energy/

The 2011 report not only showed the market was working competitively, but also showed that a transition to lower emissions is possible without price spikes. In fact, the total price per megawatt-hour of wholesale power dropped 6.2 percent across the system.

Coal-fired generation suffered in 2011, and will likely continue to experience losses in the future. Electricity from coal lost two percent of the overall market, but the cost of that electricity increased nearly twenty percent, largely due to increased operational costs and environmental regulations requiring emissions control investments.

The costs of compliance are adding up and making dirty coal more expensive, and, thus, less attractive in PJM’s power market. “These investments may result in higher offers in the capacity market, and if units do not clear, in the retirement of some units,” said the report.

This means between 5,764 and 6,936 megawatts (MW) of coal generation may soon be forced to retire, according to the report. PJM lists between 26 and 30 coal plants “at risk” of being priced out of the market — meaning it could soon be dramatically cleaner.

Source: Clean Technica (http://s.tt/17KcA)

The 2011 report not only showed the market was working competitively, but also showed that a transition to lower emissions is possible without price spikes. In fact, the total price per megawatt-hour of wholesale power dropped 6.2 percent across the system.

Coal-fired generation suffered in 2011, and will likely continue to experience losses in the future. Electricity from coal lost two percent of the overall market, but the cost of that electricity increased nearly twenty percent, largely due to increased operational costs and environmental regulations requiring emissions control investments.

The costs of compliance are adding up and making dirty coal more expensive, and, thus, less attractive in PJM’s power market. “These investments may result in higher offers in the capacity market, and if units do not clear, in the retirement of some units,” said the report.

This means between 5,764 and 6,936 megawatts (MW) of coal generation may soon be forced to retire, according to the report. PJM lists between 26 and 30 coal plants “at risk” of being priced out of the market — meaning it could soon be dramatically cleaner.

Clean Technica

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