FirstEnergy / Utilities

NOPEC signs three-year discount power deal with NextEra Energy

The Northeast Ohio Public Energy Council, or NOPEC, has negotiated a contract with a NextEra Energy wholesale power company to supply about 500,0000 Northeast Ohio electric customers in 13 counties. NextEra, based in Florida, will replace FirstEnergy Solutions on Jan. 1. NOPEC is a consortium of more than 100 communities. (credit: Plain Dealer file)

The Northeast Ohio Public Energy Council, or NOPEC, has negotiated a contract with a NextEra Energy wholesale power company to supply about 500,0000 Northeast Ohio electric customers in 13 counties. NextEra, based in Florida, will replace FirstEnergy Solutions on Jan. 1. NOPEC is a consortium of more than 100 communities. (credit: Plain Dealer file)

SOLON — “The Northeast Ohio Public Energy Council, or NOPEC, has approved a three year contract with NextEra Energy Services Ohio, a subsidiary of Florida-based NextEra Energy Resources, to supply power to some 500,000 Northeast Ohio consumers and small businesses.

NOPEC made this decision 10 days after current supplier FirstEnergy Solutions canceled its contract.

NextEra is already supplying NOPEC-represented customers with natural gas, much of it from Ohio shale gas wells, at a discounted rate.

The electric contract, which still must be approved by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio, is set to become effective on Jan. 1, the day after NOPEC’s contract with FirstEnergy Solutions ends.

Under the NextEra contract, consumer prices for the first eight months of 2017 will be fixed at rates that will be roughly 6 percent lower than the regulated price set by the Illuminating Co. and Ohio Edison, said Chuck Keiper, NOPEC’s executive director.

In other words, consumers represented by NOPEC won’t see a difference between the non-regulated FirstEnergy Solutions rate they have been paying and the new non-regulated NextEra rate, said Keiper.

…The contract calls for NextEra to use $10 million in the revenues it earns here over the next three years to build renewable energy, though not necessarily in Ohio, due to the state’s freeze on renewable energy.

‘Not only will you know you are getting a greener supply, and therefore not causing as much carbon footprint but you will also know that the money you are spending on electricity will help create a greener future,’ said Keiper.”

— John Funk, Cleveland Plain Dealer

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