Post Tagged with: "Lake Erie"

Image copyright The Blade / Library Archiving System.
Right-to-Know

Forewarned: Environmental reporters are often the town criers on looming disasters

Sometimes, we listen. Often, we don’t. TOLEDO — “Lake Erie was an American environmental success story. Once on the verge of biological death from sewage, industrial pollutants and oxygen-depriving algae, the lake bounced back in the 1970s and ’80s, as tougher environmental laws took hold in the U.S. and Canada. […]

After decades of decreases, mercury rises in Great Lakes wildlife
Coal

After decades of decreases, mercury rises in Great Lakes wildlife

Scientists are seeing an uptick of the legacy toxic in Great Lakes fish and birds. Warming waters are the suspected culprit. More coal will make it worse. SAULT STE. MARIE, MI — “Toxic mercury is once again increasing in some Great Lakes fish and birds after decades of consistent, promising […]

Banned PCBs still haunt Great Lakes
Right-to-Know

Banned PCBs still haunt Great Lakes

CHICAGO, IL — “PCB emissions may still threaten residents of Chicago and other Great Lakes communities, according to a recently published study that calls for legislation to control the largest sources of the longtime pollutant. Classified as a ‘persistent environmental pollutant’ by the EPA, PCBs cause cancer in people and […]

Toxic chemicals on rise in Lake Erie fish, scientists say
Uncategorized

Toxic chemicals on rise in Lake Erie fish, scientists say

BUFFALO, NY —”Flame-retardant chemicals could show up in greater concentrations in Lake Erie’s small-mouth bass, and scientists say an invasive species could be to blame. Researchers at the State University of New York-Buffalo found that concentrations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, are likely to increase by nearly 50 percent […]

Harmful Lake Erie algal blooms worsened by power plant pollution
Coal

Harmful Lake Erie algal blooms worsened by power plant pollution

COLUMBUS — “Aside from their link to climate change, greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel plants also include nitrogen oxides, which can add to nitrogen already entering the lakes as runoff from farming and other sources. Power plants could also contribute to algal bloom problems as they use large quantities […]